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Thread: **Official Harvey Thread** It's gon rain.

  1. #341
    becoming a regular here! ironic's Avatar
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    Here is a list I put together all by myself, a lot of these should have been taken care of 20 years ago.

    Repair and clean out the accumulated silt from Barker and Addicks reservoirs, and go ahead and build that third reservoir northwest of Addicks that’s been waiting for funding.

    Harvey was very bad, but future storms could still be worse: Imagine a 25-ft. storm surge near Galveston Bay, exactly where floodwaters would be trying to drain. Bonus: Resulting floods in nearby chemical and refining plants could be expected to trigger “one of the worst environmental disasters in U.S. history.”

    “100 year floods” have become a joke. Until a more realistic remapping can occur, maybe we should consider the 500-year zones Houston’s official floodplain.

    The areas designated as floodplains are too small because the rainfall amounts they’re based on are too small. FEMA should consider limiting new construction in these danger zones.

    Market-based approaches — such as paying landowners to raise a “crop” of stored water — should be used to preserve native prairies and wetlands in the western and northwestern portions of Harris County. One such approach: the Texas
    Coastal Exchange trading system, developed by Rice’s SSPEED Center, which requires no government funding.

    A special flooding abatement tax — with safeguards to prevent its use on other projects — would help provide funds needed for flood-damage reduction and planning projects.

    We need better real-time flood warning and information tools to help us live with regular bouts of high water. People should be able to find rainfall intensity, bayou conditions, and which roads and intersections are flooded easily. For high-priority areas of the city, these should trigger local warning systems and flood gates automatically.

    Growth patterns in the Houston region typically subsidize new development at the expense of downstream residents. Better and more stringent drainage regulations for new developments — perhaps modeled after those of Fort Bend County — would reduce runoff in older neighborhoods.

    Foundations of all new and rebuilt homes should be elevated well above the crown of the street.

    Information about precisely where and how many times flooding has occurred — and the accuracy of existing maps — should be more easily available. People should be informed if they are moving into an evacuation zone. Public elevation markers — like one removed years ago from NASA Road 1 (because it “interfered with land sales”) that show the expected height of surge flooding from Category 4 and 5 hurricanes — should be installed.

    An “Ike Dike” would protect the region’s refining and chemical infrastructure against a future storm more catastrophic than Harvey — one that comes with an envisioned 20- to 25-ft. storm surge. But a less comprehensive “mid-bay solution” would cost much less ($3 billion), offer almost as much protection, and could be funded locally.

    To ensure all flood-control work remains accountable and transparent, Houston needs to keep score. How about a continuously updated tally sheet, for each watershed, of the number of acres in the floodplain and floodway, the number and locations of flooded homes, the streets and intersections that flooded the worst, the number of cars that flooded, the dollar amount of flooding damages, all grandfathered permits and variances issued, and other metrics?

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  3. #342
    formerly 'hangnail' jamesdmanley's Avatar
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    pretty sure the corps maintain the reserviors

    flood zones were remapped after allison. google tsarp

    fema has no control over construction in the flood plain. thats up to the city/county and yes should be more restricted. houston tried several years ago and was hammered with lawsuits and eventually hamstrung their own restrictions

    paying people to store water? ehhhh

    there is already a tax district to pay for drainage improvements

    there are some pretty good flood monitoring systems already in place most people just dont know about them. ive posted several time on my business FB page. see:
    https://www.harriscountyfws.org/
    https://maps.waterdata.usgs.gov/mapper/
    https://txpub.usgs.gov/txwaterdashboard/index.html
    the usgs site could def use some work though.
    theres also an app - https://txpub.usgs.gov/water-onthego/

    storm water is HEAVILY regulated and requirements are continually being increased for land development

    raising foundations? thats a bit onerous for home owners. would probably need to be specific to areas chronically flooded

    cant speak to historical flood data. i dont know how you would gather that data other than from insurance companies. i dont work in areas effected by storm surge so i cant speak to that either

    im of the opinion that private businesses should protect their own capital. if theres danger to the public epa and city/county can probably make requirements to abate those dangers

    again, where does the data come from? insurance companies seem to be the most likely.

  4. #343
    becoming a regular here! ironic's Avatar
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    The corps have been saying for decades it will not be able to handle a storm like Harvey or any normal storm nowadays. This is why the corps stated "in Houston, we are no longer in the flood control business, we are in the flood management business" remember that stupid commercial " I'm not a security guard, I am security monitor" that is what their job is now. Allison was 16 years ago, maps are still outdated. The outdated flood zones made a bad situation worse for Harvey. There is a difference between a home being flooded from a storm, and a home being flooded to prevent a dam from breaking that should not be at risk of breaking. Many people own homes that are not in flood zones because FEMA has control over designation of floods maps, since FEMA hasn't update their maps, peoples homes that are not located in FEMA flood maps are not required to own flood insurance. There are many people who own homes that did not flood during Harvey but are at risk of flooding because the reservoirs are not up to date. There are many people who in Houston that are in flood zones now because Katy was built that weren't in flood zones during the 1960s. Around 50 percent of people who flooded during Harvey were outside of these "insurance required" out dated flood zones.


    Weird, there was all this phony talk on Facebook that the flooding was going to be much worse but everyone blew it off. Now we are here discussing about how the reservoirs almost gave way which would have wiped out all of downtown Houston. And a shit ton of people knew about it.

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